Song 61

 In
Silence

The
Great
Tree
Falls

Forms

C
R
U
CRUMBLE
B
L
E

Buddha
Jesus
Krishna

D
U
S
T

Only
The
Earth

R
E
M
A
I
N
S

You are your own religion now
Your own Green Man

R
U
S
T
L
I
N
G

At the break of dawn

 30/3/13

 Whakapapa: I love Easter with its message of death, tomb/womb, resurrection of the new man/woman. I wanted to write an Easter morning poem. Here it is. Unexpected. Surprising. Welcome. There are a number of references to recent dreams in the poem. (See below). The line ‘Your own Green Man’ is amplified through the thought of Henri Corbin. (See quotes below). In Corbin’s thought, the Green Man is the inner personal Master… the personal Holy Spirit… who guides the disciple to become what in essence the Green Man is: the centre of the world.

 ‘I saw a pregnant ant enter the nose of a golden Buddha. I knew over millennia this ant & its descendants would eat the statue until it crumbled to dust and only the Buddha remained. I experienced this happening within me. The forms of the great religions were eaten & fell to the ground as dust. Only their essence remained: burning within me. ’ 26/3/13

 ‘There was a huge ancient tree. It was absolutely massive. It grew underground up from the middle of an underground lake. I was swimming beside the tree. Suddenly it twisted & rotated: then slowly toppled & fell. Other swimmers got trapped in the rotating twisting root structure & were dragged down & drowned. I was almost trapped but managed to keep free of the twisting roots & of the falling tree. I kicked myself away from it & was safe.’ 27/3/13

 ‘I woke aware & startled. I was watching myself. It felt odd. How could I be separate from myself & watching myself? The man I was watching was wearing green. His skin was green. He had my face. I knew he was me’ 27/3/13 The night before this experience I had turned my inner eyes toward the Self in order to see the Self & as I did so the Self spoke: ‘scary might see.’

 ‘The central questions of Corbin’s book, (Alone with the Alone) and indeed perhaps of his life are set out here: “Who is Khidr?” and “What does it mean to be a disciple of Khidr?” In Sura XVIII of the Qur’an, Khidr appears in an enigmatic episode as the Guide who initiates Moses himself into the divine mysteries. He is the spiritual superior to even the prophets who reveal a Law. Louis Massignon favoured an etymology that translates Khidr as “The Verdant One.” He is the “green man” of Islam, the source of the Water of Life. He transcends the Law of Moses, the sharia of Islam, and reveals the esoteric essence of all religion. He appears only to the individuated soul. He is the Hidden Master, the personal initiatic Guide who transcends the limitations of any law or any merely human master.’ 1)

 ‘’The “act of awareness” to which being Khidr’s disciple corresponds is that of achieving your own theophany – your own inner heaven where the spring of the Water of Life is found, at the centre of the world. In this sense, then, the person of Khidr “does not resolve itself into a simple archetypal schema” but rather “the presence of this person is experienced in a relationship which transforms itself into an archetype.” Khidr is experienced by the disciple as both an archetype and as a person: he is a person-archetype. And this by each of the plurality of his disciples, for it is his transcendence which makes it possible for him to be the individuating figure that makes each disciple achieve the Khidr of his own being: each disciple becomes what Khidr is – the centre of the world. A fourteenth-century Shiite said that in the voice of Khidr ever Spiritual hears the voice of his own Holy Spirit.’ 2)

 ‘Corbin is very clearly distinguishing between the impersonality of the idea and the experience of the archetype as Jung often uses it, and the absolutely individual experience of the figure of a transcendent Person with whom there can be an intimate encounter. He may oversimplify and misconstrue Jung’s idea of the archetype, but I suggest that by stating the matter so starkly he draws attention to an issue of some importance that it is crucial to keep clear. The archetype as an impersonal “force of nature” must be differentiated from the individuating encounter with a transcendent person.’ 3)

 1)     All the World an Icon: Henry Corbin and the Angelic Function of Beings: Tom Cheetham Pg 151

2)     All the World an Icon: Henry Corbin and the Angelic Function of Beings: Tom Cheetham Pg 153  

3)     All the World an Icon: Henry Corbin and the Angelic Function of Beings: Tom Cheetham Pg 153  

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