Song 54

The cup of everyman is neither blessed nor cursed

It
Is

Earths

E
U
C
H
A
R
I
S
T
I
C

Heart

G
I
V
E
N

Before
Time
Was
Named

Beating
For
The
Broken

Beating
For
The
Poor

Beating
For
The
Outcast

Earth
Heart

Beating

Physical – Tangible

In
Us

Our

I
N
D
I
G
E
N
O
U
S

Core

Never mine

Always
Ours

This

Cup
Of
Everyman

 11/2/13

Whakapapa: the poem flows out of a ‘saying’ given by the Self: ‘the cup that I drink from is neither blessed nor cursed it is the cup of everyman’ (16/1/13). I had a sense that ‘the cup of everyman’ (& every woman) has to do with the underlying spiritual unity of humanity & the Earth: with the World Soul. This unity is spoken of in a Eucharistic prayer ‘we who are many are one bread’. In ‘the many’ I include the animals & the entire planet. I also include the planet & the animals among the broken, poor & outcast. My sense in writing the poem was that the first fruit of ‘the cup of everyman’ is compassion. When I touched briefly into the reality the words ‘the cup of everyman’ point toward I found myself awash with tears & sensing I was connecting with something very big & far beyond my comprehension. As I finished the poem I remembered the sense of connection & unity I felt in my teens when I finished John Steinbeck’s magnificent novel ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’ One of the hero’s in the book is a man called Preacher Casey. Preacher Casey is very human & has the usual short comings that come with being human; however he also has a vision that has begun to grip his life. A vision born out of the suffering he sees about him during the great depression & the Oklahoma dustbowl. His vision is that we are all part of one great big soul (In my poem ‘the cup of everyman’) and because of this he is called to side with the poor and the oppressed. Poet, folksinger and activist Woody Guthrie wrote a song called Tom Joad based on the Grapes of Wrath. These are the final two verses where Preacher Casey lays out the philosophy that is beginning to grip his life & motivating his actions:  

   

Ever’body might be just one big soul,
Well it looks that a-way to me.
Everywhere that you look, in the day or night,
That’s where I’m a-gonna be, Ma,
That’s where I’m a-gonna be.

Wherever little children are hungry and cry,
Wherever people ain’t free.
Wherever men are fightin’ for their rights,
That’s where I’m a-gonna be, Ma.
That’s where I’m a-gonna be.

The Ballad of Tom Joad: Woody Guthrie

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